I was actually really looking forward to this day, I was finally going to cook The Bug Chef’s recipe, Orthopteran Orzo, if you don’t remember, or haven’t listen to it yet. I actually made a podcast with David George Gordon, The Bug Chef and he recommended that I try this recipe. You can find the podcast here.

Now I just want to say, first of all, I’m not a great cook, second of all, I’m not really fond of veggies, but here’s the recipe for 6 people. Those are small servings in my opinion, but be careful not to make too much.

For this recipe, it is actually important that you use fresh crickets nymphs, as dried-out insects will just “ruin” the dish.

You’ll need:

  • 3 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 cup orzo
  • 1/2 cup grated carrot
  • 1/4 cup finely diced red bell pepper
  • 1/4 cup finely diced green bell pepper
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1/2 cup chopped yellow onion
  • 1 cup frozen two- or three-week-old cricket nymphs, thawed
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  1. Bring the broth to a boil, then stir in the orzo.
  2. Continue boiling the orzo until it is tender, about 10 minutes; drain any extra liquid, then quickly add the carrot and red and green peppers. Mix evenly and set aside.
  3. In a separate skillet, melt the butter and add the garlic, onion, and crickets. Sauté briefly until the onions are translucent and the garlic and crickets have browned.
  4. Cooking with grasshoppers
  5. Combine the cricket mixture, including any liquid, with the orzo and vegetables, top with parsley, and serve.

As you can see, the recipe is fairly simple, unless you’re a European and need to convert all the measurements!

And for the taste, I’m sorry to say, I don’t like it very much, first of all even without the crickets, the raw veggies are just not my thing, so, it’s not a good start. Second of all, David George Gordon did tell me to get some crickets that were not adults as they were more tender and didn’t have their wings yet. Again, if you haven’t listened to the podcast, I think you should listen to it here.

Cooking with locusts

I didn’t at all follow these recommendations, and I probably should have. I used adult grasshoppers, the ones I ate the other day in the article Netflix and Grasshoppers. So, I changed the recipe, that one is on me, and adult grasshoppers have wings and legs that aren’t so pleasant in the mouth. I also tried taking the wings off when they were in my plate, it still wasn’t great.

I actually had prepared this dish for my family, and no one liked it, so I made quite of a bad impression with my bugs today. I think I shouldn’t have used grasshoppers for starters, and maybe cooked the vegetables?

Orthopteran Orzo

Anyways, this wasn’t a success, but I’m not giving up, and neither should you, if you still haven’t listened to my podcast with The Bug Chef, go listen to it now. This recipe is a part of the Eat-A-Bug Cookbook and there are plenty other recipes in this book, surely I’ll find one that corresponds more to my palate. It’s one of Michela Dai Zovi’s favourite books, and I have to say, I love it too, this recipe doesn’t change my opinion on it. If you want to buy it, you can find it on Amazon here.

Rating time, on a scale from 1 to 10:

  • The Orthopteran Orzo gets a 4/10. I don’t believe it comes from the recipe alone, I think it’s also the ingredients I used, you can see in my article Netflix and Grasshoppers where I ate the same grasshoppers, they also scored a 4/10, a pattern seems to be forming around them…

If this is the first article you’re reading, I’ll ask you to go back to the main article by clicking here, to find out loads of other cool bug related food during this challenge.

I hope you enjoyed this article, if you want to read more, please don’t hesitate to follow me on this blog and on my social media accounts. If you have any questions, I’d love to answer them, please leave a comment.

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